Wednesday, May 16, 2018

A new comic! Sociocultural Theories of Learning: Mediation

I'm currently taking Ebony Flowers's course Making Comics for Research, at OISE. Learning so much, and making some fun comics every week! Last week's assignment, to make a 2-page concept comic, plus title page, gave me the opportunity to play around with using comics to explain sociocultural theories of learning. I'm toying with the idea of making a comics companion to Power and Privilege in the Learning Sciences, so it was fun to try this out.

Now that I have posted this, I realize that for accessibility, I probably should figure out how to caption comics properly! I'll come back and update once I've figured this out.




Monday, January 8, 2018

Learning in the Learning Sciences: A talk given at University of Calgary

In November 2017 I had the privilege of presenting a seminar talk to the University of Calgary's Learning Sciences group. I'm pleased that the talk was videorecorded, and you can view it if you have Adobe Connect. I was told that you don't need any kind of login so anyone should be able to watch.

Here's the talk:
https://connectmeeting.ucalgary.ca/p3qp5xtbsja/
I haven't yet transcribed it but I hope to put a pdf version of the transcript up here sometime in the next few weeks.

The recording begins with the territorial acknowledgement and an introduction. I start speaking at about 2:20 and the talk is presented in two parts. The first part provides a super fast overview of the book Power and Privilege in the Learning Sciences, co-edited by me and Angela Booker, published in December 2016. For about 20 minutes I talk about sociocultural theories of learning, critical race theory, critical discourse theories of race, queer theory, critical disability studies, settler colonial theory and indigenous epistemologies, and critical pedagogy. Then, at about 28:00, I transition to a discussion of faculty work. I spend the next 20 minutes or so sharing some stories and drawings of my own life, to connect the critical theories from the first half of the talk, to the question: What lives and ideas do the university and the field make possible, probable, easy and hard?

Here's my favorite drawing from the second half of the talk.



If you watch, I'd love to hear your thoughts. Giving this talk, with so many personal stories, felt like a big risk and I am very grateful to the University of Calgary Learning Sciences folks for being such an engaged and appreciative audience.